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January 16, 2004
This Place

by Gillette aka Hassan[uddin] Khaja

Cursed is the one who led me to this place of disgrace
Where I race to fulfill my base tastes
And disfigure my face
I rush to drink from a goblet laced with dunya

Cursed is the one who led me to this place where i'm killed with kindness and blindness
And mindless jokes about "poor-hungry-money doctors"
I'm dead from my own laughter
But I dreamt of another chapter after which I captured the demon
And hung him from a rafter
And I looked at him enraptured with my feat

Cursed is the one who led me to this place where I grow obese with every piece of cheesesteak and dunya that I'm given from this silicone beast
At least I could feast on my Lord
And release myself from this state into a state of peace
But the devil signed me on to another lease

Cursed is the one who led me to this place and made me a culture-whore
"Sacrifice obedience to your Lord and we'll give you a great reward
First you'll have to stop praying to get your foot in the door
And there's more in store if you 'live' yourself to death
And beat your family till they're sore
Cause you haven't lived until you've sinned"

Cursed is the one who led me to this place and attempted to lead me to my doom and look to the other side of the room and swoon over halfway hijabs
The brighter the hijab, the darker the heart
The brighter the heart, the darker the scarf
The hearts are dark as the devil wished

Oh Allah, save me from the accursed.

of and relating to...

Subhanallah...may Allah bless you and your writing Insha'allah

Posted by: talib ul'ilm at November 12, 2003 10:01 AM

Mashallah, you'll never seize to amaze me Gillette.

Posted by: Faisal Akhtar at November 12, 2003 02:21 PM

FIIIIII-YYYYYAAAAAAA!!

Another inferno from gillette! I loved this one especially the "poor hungry money doctors" line, lol (hint hint). Oh man, I think you should keep your confidentiality b/c the sisters might not like the last stanza :)

Keep that flaming sword swinging Gillette

Posted by: Oh. Schick aka Ibn Masood at November 12, 2003 03:38 PM

I have to say the last stanza ... bulls eye.

I've always wanted to address this controversial issue, albeit delicately. Very succinct. Thanks.

I truly hope no one gets offended and that everyone really thinks about it; if it's not applicable to us, let's not worry about it; but if it is, let's fix ourselves. Thanks again.


Posted by: Seeker at November 13, 2003 08:58 AM

Nah, I don't agree, I have seen female alims that wear white hijabs, and sisters that are better than any of us, that wear light hijabs. I understand what your getting at thought, but I know u can state it better than this way (and avoid potentially insulting a lot of sisters). Arif, correct me if i'm wrong, but if any of us had written something like this back in the days, the sisters would've taken ALL the brothers' heads.
Author, come on down to busch student center around 9:30 tonight, don't forget, I know where you pray ;).

Wajahat Gilani

Posted by: Wajahat Gilani at November 13, 2003 10:11 AM

Man Waj, you like creating up a storm huh...You get the writer's point and thas exactly what he wants...remember the exceptions always prove the rule..but ure right about back in the day, but then again that might be because this might not have been needed back in the day :)

Posted by: Arif at November 13, 2003 12:40 PM

"I truly hope no one gets offended and that everyone really thinks about it; if it's not applicable to us, let's not worry about it; but if it is, let's fix ourselves. Thanks again."

THANK YOU SEEKER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I COULD NOT HAVE SAID IT BETTER MYSELF!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Posted by: Gillette at November 13, 2003 02:47 PM

just a little suggestion...we need to learn adab, whether it's talking with each other or posting articles...some of the phrasology used displays very bad adab...u guys know what i'm referring to with this poem...we just shouldn't use certain terms, regardless of the meaning behind them...

take care insha'allah

Posted by: Arif at November 14, 2003 10:26 AM

I'm not quite sure that's bad adab.

Posted by: Gillette at November 14, 2003 04:24 PM

Gillette,

Would you let your mom read that poem?

Wajahat Gilani

Posted by: Wajahat Gilani at November 14, 2003 05:45 PM

There's a lot of things I wouldn't tell my mom, but they're not necessarily inappropriate.

Posted by: Gillette at November 14, 2003 05:58 PM

Maybe you should run it by, an alim or teacher your comfortable with?

Wajahat Gilani

Posted by: Wajahat Gilani at November 14, 2003 06:05 PM

When I said "bright hijabs", I didn't mean the white ones, but the ones that stand out (the glow in the dark stuff). This is subject to further discussion

Posted by: Gillette at November 14, 2003 08:40 PM

I wasn't referring to the hijabs part...it's other use of words in the poem that's all...Put it this way, I don't think you would say that poem in front of a scholar or your teacher...

Posted by: Arif at November 14, 2003 11:29 PM

Assalam-o-Alaikom.
I found an excellent article online about Naseehah (advice) and how to give it. I think Mashallah, all of the people here recognize the importance of giving advice since so many people are posting. Religion indeed is Naseehah but what kind of Naseehah was our Prophet (SAW) talking about when he said "Religion is Naseehah"? (I found this Hadith posted on websites but I was not able to ascertain its correctness, if someone could please tell me, I would greatly appreciate it)

Islam advises us about everything and indeed, it also advises us on how to give advice (what about advice on how to give advice on how to give advice? LOL) Putting the jokes aside, we really need to learn the etiquette of advising before we post on this website. I will highlight some of the etiquette I find to be pertinent to our situation. I am cutting and posting straight from the website (anything in parenthesis is my own addition).

1. Modesty:
A sincere Muslim should never show a didactic attitude when advising others; trying to teach people what to do frequently make them turn away from you. Furthermore, follow an indirect way in conveying your advice whenever possible. Al-Hassan and Al-Hussein, may Allah be pleased with them, once saw an old man making Wudoo' incorrectly. They approached him and said, "O uncle!, my brother and I, are arguing about the right way of making Wudoo', would you watch us and see who does it better?" After watching them, the man said, "Both of you do it right; it is I who do it wrong." With this politeness, the two boys were able to convey their advice to a man who is much older than they were without hurting his dignity.

(Ok maybe it is difficult to always be indirect and we are nowhere near the level of Hasan and Hussain in brilliance but is there really no other way? Can anyone think of a better way than saying outright ?what you are doing is wrong?? I know some of you will say that we need to stop ?sugar coating? everything but our Prophet said "Indeed Allah is gentle and loves gentleness, and gives due to gentleness that which He does not give due to harshness."
[Ibn Maajah, ibn Hibbaan; Hasan]
Can we please be a little more gentle?)

2. Secrecy:
All the eminent scholars of Islam agree that secrecy is a requisite for an advice to be accepted. Abu Hatim Al Basti said, "Giving advice is an obligation on everybody, but it should be given in private. Whoever advises his brother in private does him a favor; and who ever advises his brother in public hurts him." Al-Fudail said, "A believer keeps secrets, while an unbeliever reveals them and reproaches people in public." Sufyan was asked "Do you like that someone inform you of your defects?." He answered "If he comes advising me in private, yes; but if he comes slandering me in public, no."
In order for his advice to be accepted by Allah, an adviser should be sincere, seeking only the reward from Allah. Giving advice in public contradicts sincerity since it indicates that the adviser is only trying to be seen of others (i.e., Riyaa').

(I cannot comment on the intention of the authors on Hidayaonline since only Allah knows best what they intended but we need to severely check ourselves when we give such advice. How many of us know Sisters who wear bright Hijabs? How many of us know people who went to the last Palestine rally? I went to the last Palestine rally and I know many people who were there by name. I know some of the Sisters by name and others I do not who wear bright Hijabs. How did it make these people feel when the authors made these comments? I am not disagreeing with the stance Ali and Gillete took in their writings but is that the best way to take a stance? If you think this (Hidayaonline) is anonymous private advising well then you are wrong. We at ISRU know each other very well Mashallah and people can be identified easily, are the authors positive that they upheld the condition of secrecy?)

3. Verification:
Before giving an advice, one should first make sure that it was not his misunderstanding of the other person's behavior and that the latter really did something wrong.
(Maybe, just maybe some of the sisters actually did not know that ostentation in color ought to be avoided but before writing that last verse of your poem, did you really think about that Gillete? Maybe some relevance to your article Ali?)

4. Gentleness:
Describing the manners of Prophet Muhammad (PBUH), and warning us against harshness, Allah(SWT) says:
{Because of the Mercy of Allah you dealt with them gently. And were you severe, harsh-hearted, they would have broken away from about you} (Qur'an 3:159)
And the Prophet (PBUH) said, "Allah is gentle and He likes gentleness in everything." Harshness and rudeness make people reject the advice, and bring about failure to a da'iyah. Sayyid Qutb urges us to be kind to people, by saying: "When you touch the good side in the souls of people, you find a great deal of good nature the eye cannot perceive on first glance. All it needs is some affection toward their mistakes and foolishness, true amity for them, and a little unstilted care about their griefs and concerns, only then will you uncover the good side in their souls".
Our leader, the Messenger of Allah (PBUH), gives us the best example in gentleness. It was narrated by Muslim that Mu'awiyah ibn Al-Hakam said, "While I was offering Salaah behind the Prophet (PBUH), a man sneezed, then I said, `May Allah have mercy on you.' Then people started gazing at me, I said, `Woe to me, what is wrong with you? Why are you looking at me like this?" But none of them answered. Instead, they started clapping their hands on their thighs. I understood that they wanted me to stop talking, so I stopped. After he finished praying, Prophet Muhammad (PBUH), who is the best teacher I have ever seen, neither hit me nor reproached me, he turned to me and gently said, "During Salaah, one should not utter any kind of ordinary speech; only praise Allah, magnify Him, and recite the Qur'an".

(Read the first point again if you will)

5. Avoiding searching for mistakes:
Some people, while thinking they are doing right, commit great iniquities by searching for the mistakes and defects of others. Whoever keeps himself busy looking for the defects of others, will surely be subject to punishment from Allah in this life by uncovering his defects in front of others. A true Muslim should hope that others do not commit iniquities, while an envious person hopes that they do wrong and is happy when they do; and the advice of the latter cannot be accepted by Allah. A Muslim should never look for defects or mistakes, but if he sees them, then he gives the appropriate advice.

(Mashallah, though again I cannot comment on the intentions of the authors, I don?t think anyone is guilty of this and all praise is due to Allah)

(This part is mine) So Brothers and sisters, we need to be mindful of our intentions and our means of advising before we actually advise. May Allah Guide Us All.

Two things before I beg your leave

First. I agree with Gillete on his point that ostentation in color and clothing is wrong and I also agree with Ali Farooki that a Muslim should only beg at the door of Allah (swt) but just because I agree with the ends does not mean I agree with the means of attaining them.

Second. I understand that Brother Talal wanted to shut down the debate on anonymity and pseudonyms but I feel like I should get in my ten cents. If you think this inappropriate, you can delete it Brother Talal. Giving advice is also a form of fighting in the way of Allah since one risks the displeasure of others by advising but since one only should seek the pleasure of Allah, when one takes these risks like the Prophets did, Allah (swt) will reward him. By seeking anonymity and using pseudonyms, I fear that we detract from the Reward since there is very little risk involved to ourselves. If anyone will get blamed, it will be the false name and the reputation of the person remains intact. This keeps ones own intention out of check too. If someone should make a mistake, they will start using another name and no one will ever know. Part of being a Muslim is recognizing your mistakes and correcting them. If we seek forgiveness, Allah (swt) is oft forgiving and perhaps anonymity is the reason some sisters are not posting comments in response to that last verse of your Gillette because they really do not know who it is they speak to. A reputable source has informed me that ISRU sisters have something to say about that last verse. I encourage people to use their real names in hopes of having a more honest discussion.

That being said,

Wasalam

Faisal Akhtar
Aka Pakipatloon
Aka the Fundamentalist
Aka Peace on Earth Advocate (between you and me Gillete)

My sources (Please post all your sources since they can be a great way for others to seek knowledge)

http://fortyhadith.iiu.edu.my/hadith07.htm
http://www.maschicago.org/youth/library/islamic_movement/passages_of_truth/nasiha.htm
Article on Nasihah

Posted by: Faisal Akhtar at November 15, 2003 02:48 AM

Assalaamualaikum,

Faisal, I have no idea who you are, but inshallah, I hope you start helping the brothers and sisters write for this site.

walaikumsalaam
Wajahat Gilani

Posted by: Wajahat Gilani at November 17, 2003 10:53 AM

Assalaamu 'alaikum warahmatullah,

Masha'Allah Faisal I have to commend you with your insight on this issue. I also got that feeling that you wrote about having pseudonames allows us to escape the criticism because no one knows who we are.
As far as the hijab comments, while I like the bluntness of Gillette in saying what he believes and while I do agree that hijabs shouldn't be colorful, I must say that I know many pious women who do wear colorful hijabs (my mom being a case in point), and if it brings our beloved sisters closer to wearing the hijab, then I see nothing wrong in it.
Keep posting and informing us from your knowledge Insha'Allah.
Let's pray for Allah to keep increasing us in Iman and in knowledge Insha'Allah.

Arif
aka talib ul'ilm
aka 'Abd

Posted by: Arif Hussain at November 17, 2003 12:53 PM

Assalam-o-alaikom.

In response to Wajahat
I have no idea who you are either but I must say that is something I am not proud of. I am one of the more introverted people at ISRU and I wish to change myself. Inshallah, I will ask Gillette to introduce us.

In response to Arif.
My central argument about pseudonyms was not that it allows us to escape criticism, although it does that too but I fear that we detract from our reward when we do use pseudonyms. Indeed our only purpose here is to seek the pleasure of Allah(swt) and I fear by using pseudonyms, we detract from that. I must also add that this is my understanding of the situation and it is not an opinion backed by evidence from the Quran and Hadith nor by scholarly understanding. So this is simply my humble opinion, anyone can disagree with it solely on the basis that it is not backed by evidence and in that they would be correct.

Also, "Actions depend on intentions". The problem Gillete has mostly is with those sisters who wear colorful hijabs not to cover their heads, but to attarct attention. That is wrong period. The rest of your comment I agree with.

Wasalam

Faisal Akhtar
Aka Pakipatloon
Aka The Fundamentalist
Aka Peace on Earth Advocate

Posted by: Faisal Akhtar at November 17, 2003 03:05 PM

To Arif,

"As far as the hijab comments, while I like the bluntness of Gillette in saying what he believes and while I do agree that hijabs shouldn't be colorful, I must say that I know many pious women who do wear colorful hijabs (my mom being a case in point)..."

you've contradicted yourself. if you have said that hijabs shouldn't be colorful (and i assume that we are dealing in terms of islamic "should's" and "should not's"), then you imply that colorful hijabs are not characteristic of piety. what is uncharacteristic of piety is characteristic of impiety, with all due respect to all the "pious women" that you refer to, including your "mom."

my own opinion is subject to further discussion.

Posted by: Gillette at November 17, 2003 11:08 PM

To Gillette.
Reading your poem, it seems as if you define the color of the hijab as being the only characteristic of piety and I quote

"The brighter the hijab, the darker the heart
The brighter the heart, the darker the scarf"

You have hammered it into my head time and time again that simply wearing the Hijab is not the only indicator of piety, why then do your words imply that the color of the Hijab is directly proportional to the color of the heart meaning piety? Is that the only indicator of piety?

I found a question on www.islam-qa.com about exactly what color the hijab can and cannot be. It basically states that women shouldn't wear colors characteristic of men in society. They also shouldn't wear decorated hijabs which are intended to provoke desire in men since the purpose of Hijab is to hide the beauty of women. If the Hijab magnifies that beauty, it defeats the purpose. The reason certain women wear black Hijabs is because it is the farthest removed from adornment and women are required not to adorn themselves for strange (non-mahram) men but it is not a requirement to wear black since it is not requirement of hijab and the purpose of hijab can be achieved by a hijab of a color other than black and it is permissible for women to wear other colors. So even if certain women wear colors other than the traditional black, it does not correlate to how dark their hearts are. A hijab of a color other than black is different from a hijab designed to provoke desire and display beauty. That being said

Wasalam

Faisal Akhtar
Aka pakipatloon (my AIM ID)
Aka the fundamentalist
Aka peace on earth advocate

My sources

www.islam-qa.com

http://63.175.194.25/index.php?ln=eng&ds=qa&lv=browse&QR=39570&dgn=4 (question # 39750)

http://63.175.194.25/index.php?ds=qa&lv=browse&QR=6991&dgn=3& (question # 6991)

On a side note, if anyone reading this post has time, go to www.jannah.org and in the articles section read the article titled "The Physics of the Day of Judgement". I recommend it highly since it describes modern scince and natural laws in terms of the Book of Allah and how things might come to pass by our current understanding. Here is the complete link, just cut and paste in the browser address bar

http://www.jannah.org/articles/physics.html

Posted by: Faisal Akhtar at November 18, 2003 01:59 AM

I can't do justice to the topic in the form of a comment, but, in short, this matter is more a matter of akhlaq. akhlaq is the truest indicater of the state of the heart, since it really can't be helped.

it also reflects another level of thinking. technically, at the surface, there is nothing wrong with men and women just covering their bodies, but, a truer understanding of islam shows that indifference is better than extravagance.

also, in the place that i wrote this, the issues in the poem came to a head.

Posted by: Gillette at November 18, 2003 06:31 AM

Brother Gillette,
I don't know who you are, but I am assuming you are a brother, b/c it would only be a brother who would make a comment like this( I'm referring to the comment about hijab). I find it very interesting how a brother, who has no experience of what it feels like to blatantly walk out of your house everyday openly declaring your Islam to every man, woman, stranger that passes by, can make so easy a judgement on those who do. Maybe you don't realize brother Gillette, that when a sister observes hijab, she is making dawah 24/7 and is making efforts in whatever way she can to become better and try to become closer to Allah. Isn't it better than those who make no effort at all? Yes, hijab is not simply just a covering on your head, and its about covering inwardly and outwardly in modesty and in an appropriate manner. At the same time, if a sister who wears a hijab on her head, wears short-sleeves or make-up or anything of the sort, etc., I find it repulsing that people, especially the brothers are so quick to judge her Islam, instead of advising her in a gentle, appropriate manner. It is actually ridiculous that we refer to you as our brothers in Islam, yet instead of properly giving naseeha, you make an open criticism to the world (remember, non-Muslims read the articles on this site as well) that sisters who wear bright hijabs have "dark hearts." That is a strong assumption. (I wonder if I can say, the longer the beard, the purer the heart.) What it seems you fail to look at, is that that if a sister found motivation to start doing even that little bit, instead of encouraging her to practice it in a more rightful manner, you are outright discouraging your sister, by straight up criticizing her. BE CAREFUL in assuming that any of your brothers or sisters has a "dark heart" because that is a serious accusation. Also, please look at the manner in the way you give naseeha to your sisters, especially in matters that you have no experience with, and think to yourself, would the Prophet (peace be upon him) say something like this?

Posted by: Husna at November 26, 2003 10:34 AM

Sister, I would first like to urge you to understand gillette's poem in light of the meaning he is trying to get across. Firstly, good guess, he is a brother, lol. But you are wrong in assuming only brothers think this way because I know sisters who agree with him. He is referring to those sisters that have taken the Hijab as a fashion statement and as a new trend (those that have the glow-in-the-dark ones). Islam has become somewhat of a hobby and a fad for some people instead of a way of life.

"I find it very interesting how a brother, who has no experience of what it feels like to blatantly walk out of your house everyday openly declaring your Islam to every man, woman, stranger that passes by, can make so easy a judgement on those who do. Maybe you don't realize brother Gillette, that when a sister observes hijab, she is making dawah 24/7 and is making efforts in whatever way she can to become better and try to become closer to Allah. Isn't it better than those who make no effort at all?"

I'm sorry sister, but you make it sound like Hijab is a disease that you have or a punishment that has been inflicted on you. Hijab should be viewed as a blessing, a gift, and an honor just as a beard should. Also, if you knew Gillette you would not accuse him of not having any idea of what sisters go through by openly displaying their Islam, lol. This type of argumentation is fruitless anyway, because brothers do display their Islam outwardly also [beards and kufis]. Not to make any comparison or competition, but I highly doubt that sisters get stopped by the FBI or held by the authorities at the airport like brothers do. Anyway, its not important to argue over who has it worse because the sunnah is not a disease or a punishment. We should be proud to have it. Imam Malik said: "The Sunnah is like the ark of Noah. Whoever embarks upon it achieves salvation and whoever rejects it, is drowned" [ Reported in Majmoo al-Fataawa (4/57)].

Also, please don't absolve yourself from the ties of brotherhood and sisterhood. If we made mistakes, forgive us, and Allah would forgive you. Please don't turn his poem into an attack on sisters because it's not that. I'm sure he loves the sisters (really really loves the sisters, lol) and he is trying to advise them in a matter that he is good at, poetry. The effect he is trying to achieve might be amplified because it is in poetry and not prose, so please understand that.

On behalf of the brothers, I just want to say we are not against the sisters or in competition with them except in doing good deeds. Please don't declare war on the brothers because we don't want to be at odds with our sisters. We should be helping each other in righteousness and not arguing about grade school things like this.

As for would the Prophet say something like this, then I would like to remind you that the Prophet did say things to women that they didn't like at the time, but they came to understand it for the correct way it was intended so I urge you not to take things personally and understand what he is trying to get across.


Posted by: Oh. Schick aka Ali Bin Masood Farooki at November 28, 2003 08:05 PM

"I don't know who you are, but I am assuming you are a brother, b/c it would only be a brother who would make a comment like this( I'm referring to the comment about hijab). I find it very interesting how a brother, who has no experience of what it feels like to blatantly walk out of your house everyday openly declaring your Islam to every man, woman, stranger that passes by, can make so easy a judgement on those who do. Maybe you don't realize brother Gillette, that when a sister observes hijab, she is making dawah 24/7 and is making efforts in whatever way she can to become better and try to become closer to Allah."

I have a relatively terrorist-like beard. It's worse for us because we're the oppressors [of women], not the oppressed.

"...you make an open criticism to the world (remember, non-Muslims read the articles on this site as well) that sisters who wear bright hijabs have "dark hearts." That is a strong assumption."

"My goal is for people to recognize kufr for what it is and iman for what it is. Once they see the two, they can grab iman as they should, and leave kufr as they should. In a previous column, I said that “ALL good…[is]…iman…[and]...ALL bad…[is]…kufr.” So when I said, in another column that extravagance (bright hijabs) is a reflection of a dark heart, that is because, extravagant hijabs being something to stay away from, all that is harmful for us is kufr, which is a result of some disease of the heart. Likewise, excessive humor, such as “mindless jokes about ‘poor-hungry-money doctors,’” is harmful for us (according to a hadeeth in Imam Al-Bukhari’s “Book of Manners, Morals, and Etiquettes,” laughter kills the heart). (http://hidayaonline.com/archives/000058.html)"

"(I wonder if I can say, the longer the beard, the purer the heart.)"

That would be quite insulting to ibn 'umar.

"What it seems you fail to look at, is that that if a sister found motivation to start doing even that little bit, instead of encouraging her to practice it in a more rightful manner, you are outright discouraging your sister, by straight up criticizing her. BE CAREFUL in assuming that any of your brothers or sisters has a "dark heart" because that is a serious accusation. Also, please look at the manner in the way you give naseeha to your sisters, especially in matters that you have no experience with, and think to yourself, would the Prophet (peace be upon him) say something like this?"

"at November 18, 2003 11:37 PM, Gillette said
There's nothing wrong with working towards something, as Wajahat said, but there's the possibility that, in growing a goatee as the next step, we'll take the goatee as an ends.
(http://hidayaonline.com/badr/mt-comments.cgi?entry_id=56)"

This reasoning can be applied to the hijab issue as well.

I'm not hear to end discussion, only to start it. May Allah (SWT) grant us hidaya.

[In the interest of putting Oh. Schick's advice into practice, (for those who don't already know)]:

Posted by: Gillette, aka Hassan[uddin] Khaja aka Imam of the Dead-Hearted at November 28, 2003 08:20 PM

Also, for a nice nasheed in Arabic on hijab called "Hijaabe Al_Muslimah" by Sh. Ahmad Ajmy (my favorite quran recitor) go to
http://www.al-islaam.com/al-islaam/audiovideo/anasheedram/al-islaam/html/alajmy/1.html

It's a really good nasheed and I urge everyone especially sisters to listen to it. If you don't know arabic, get someone to translate for you.

Posted by: Oh. Schick aka Ali Bin Masood Farooki at November 28, 2003 08:21 PM

I'm not sure what all this discussion is about, but I'm curious about these glow-in-the dark hijaabs. I've never seen one. Can someone tell me where to get one?

Posted by: guess at November 28, 2003 08:49 PM

"I'm not sure what all this discussion is about, but I'm curious about these glow-in-the dark hijaabs. I've never seen one. Can someone tell me where to get one? "

"glow-in-the-dark" meaning anything that draws way to much attention. We all know how a glow-in-the-dark object grabs our attention in a dark room

Posted by: Gillette, aka Hassan[uddin] Khaja aka Imam of the Dead-Hearted at November 28, 2003 08:57 PM

So where can I get one? Are there any black-friday sales going on? Another question- where is "this place" that you keep mentioning? Please tell me, as it sounds like an interesting place.

Posted by: guess at November 28, 2003 09:01 PM

Dear guess,
If you would like to post something, please include your name as it provides for some accountability for your statements. Refer to my article on Pseudonyms.

Also, this caustic sarcasm is quite unnecessary. The "place" that he is referring to is not a spatial or temporal space, but a spiritual place, a condition of the hearts.

Again, please include your name if you are going to post and don't hide behind fake names especially if you are trying to insult someone using internet muscle.

Posted by: Oh. Schick aka Ali Bin Masood Farooki at November 28, 2003 11:54 PM